State Aid Values Statements (with comments)

The state aid program will recognize that public libraries are locally funded.


The state aid program will require a minimum level of local funding from each community.

EC--Is this limited to local public funding? If a local benefactor wishes to donate all operating costs for a library in a community, will that be ok and qualify the community for state aid?

The state aid program will take into account that participation in the program is voluntary.

EC--If a library voluntarily decides not to participate, will its community be blacklisted and trigger, " the state aid program will terminate reciprocal borrowing privileges, in person and via interlibrary loan, for residents of communities that are not certified as meeting the minimum eligibility requirements," because how will the state aid program know if a library is meeting the minimum eligibility requirements if they voluntarily did not participate.

The state aid program will have minimum requirements that must be met in order to be certified.


The state aid program will take into consideration the variations of local budgets and library programmatic services in each community.


The state aid program will be easy to understand and to explain to trustees, municipal boards and other interested entities.

BJ--The cataloguer in me worries about that "easy". I do think that we can come up with a system that can be understood at a basic level in a few minutes for lobbying purposes. I also think that we can develop something that a person of average intelligence can intuit in nearly its entirety given a few hours of study. I *don't* believe that a high quality, granular, customised system will lend itself to "easy" or quick explanation should a user wish to know all there is to know about it. Just as I think it is possible to have a system where the paperwork is simple to compleat as well as consume about the same amount of time as the current system yet be deliciously more complex than the current model

The state aid program will acknowledge libraries that meet and/or exceed minimum requirements.

BJ--I feel like this needs to be fleshed out a bit more, because "How?" immediately popped into my brain.

The state aid program will compensate libraries for network transfers, interlibrary loans, and non-resident circulation.

BJ--I admit my relationship with WMRLS forces a bias to appear on this one, but I feel I'd be remiss if I didn't keep stating this. I fret over the dynamics of focusing singularly on State Aid to Public Libraries (while I do respect the monstruosity of that scope alone) without due regard to State Aid to Regional Libraries. It just seems lopsided to reward individual libraries with very little acknowledgement of delivery costs at a Regional level. The tough to convey qualities of resource sharing need to be addressed somehow. Someone, somehow, some time in the murky future ought to come up with a relational diagram so that folks can understand the forces at work.

The state aid program will terminate reciprocal borrowing privileges, in person and via interlibrary loan, for residents of communities that are not certified as meeting the minimum eligibility requirements. (Local communities and/or library networks in proximity to a community with an uncertified library may vote to reinstate borrowing privileges.)

EC--This seems a bit confusing. What's the point of the value statement if adjacent communities vote to reinstate?

The state aid program will apply a process to recognize that catastrophic economic circumstances, not under the control of the community, temporarily affect library budgets.

BJ--Again, I'd like to see this fleshed out, but I suspect just as the former it will be before the work is done.

The state aid program will ensure that no certified library receives less funding than they receive under the current program.

BJ--Hmmm. Do I agree with the premise? Absolutely. I'm unsure whether we can deliver on this thanks to lobbying alone, nevermind the mathematical ramifications of changing the programme.

Respectfully submitted:
Diane Giarrusso, Susan McAlister, Vanessa Verkade, Dianne Carty
1/18/07 Comments added 1/25/2007

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Page last updated on 09/6/2007