Moving on up: $35.6 million Jones Library project now second on statewide waiting list

A $35.6 million renovation and expansion planned for the Jones Library is now second on the statewide waiting list for library projects.

The project, in line for $13.87 million in funding, moved up two spots when the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC) in July awarded provisional funding for a $7.49 million project in Sharon and a $5.84 million in Littleton.

Continue Reading on the Daily Hampshire Gazette

Medford to start work on new $34 million library

Medford is preparing to begin construction of a $34 million public library that officials said will allow them to meet a longstanding need for more space and improved facilities. In October, contractors are set to begin demolishing the existing 60-year-old library to make way for the new 44,000-square-foot facility, to be built on the same High Street site.

Read more on the Boston Globe

St. Louis and Boston Public Libraries Used Twitter Book Stacks to Face Off Over Stanley Cup

During the 2019 Stanley Cup, there was another rivalry going on in addition to the one on the ice between the St. Louis Blues and Boston Bruins, which ended in the Blues winning last night. The friendlier sparring occurred between the cities’ respective libraries, the St. Louis Public Library and Boston Public Library, who were battling it out on Twitter.

Continue Reading on Forbes

Weymouth library groundbreaking ‘signifies era of vibrancy’

A new $33 million Tufts Library will provide patrons with dozens of computers, reliable wireless internet capabilities, additional book volumes, CDs and DVDs when it is completed in 15 months.

“We are going from a tight children’s room to one that is two-and-a-half times the size,” said Robert MacLean, Weymouth Public Libraries director during a groundbreaking ceremony March 27. “It will include a story time and craft rooms, study rooms, and a nursery room. There is so much more to come.”

Continue reading from Wicked Local Weymouth

Sawyer Free Library digitizing Gloucester’s early records

It’s hard to imagine that early community leaders — busy compiling, say, the Gloucester Town and Selectman Records starting in 1642 — could have imagined residents accessing those records from a lit screen in their homes nearly 400 years later.

Continue reading at the Gloucester Daily Times Website