Boston Public Library makes thousands of images available free online

The Boston Public Library has made more than 8,000 photos, ranging from pictures documenting the construction of the McKim library building in Copley Square to 19th-century daguerreotypes, publicly available on Wikimedia Commons, according to library officials.

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Children’s librarian Kay Lyons to retire: ‘I found I had a way with children’

Librarian Kay Lyons has journeyed with local children for almost three decades to places like Wonderland, Narnia and Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, but when she retires in March, it’s her turn. She and her husband, Rick Roy, will take some trips of their own, though never forgetting the joy she’s known.

Read more from the Greenfield Recorder

Amherst council gets go-ahead to use $1M in CPA funds on Jones Library work

In a reversal from earlier in the year, the Community Preservation Act Committee is recommending that the Town Council use $1 million from the account for the proposed build-out of a new special collections room at the Jones Library.

Read more from the Daily Hampshire Gazette

Special election to be held for book-loving kids

While the adults in their lives head to the polls to choose a president, kids across Massachusetts are being asked to participate in another type of election.

Starting Monday, at www.KidsVoteForBooks.com, young people can choose their favorite books and see if their choices are in the Top 25 when the votes are tallied. Voting is open through Nov. 9.

Read more on Cape Cod Times

Business is booming at Fairhaven, Acushnet libraries

If there’s a service that’s been thriving for municipalities during the pandemic it’s been public libraries.

While internal access to libraries continues to be either very limited or non-existent, use of libraries’ resources, whether physical or digitized, is available and in demand.

Read more on South Coast Today

Disinfectant, Gloves And Quarantined Books: How Massachusetts Libraries Are Coping As They Slowly Reopen

The public library in Franklin has been loaning books for 230 years — the town boasts the first continuous public-lending library in the nation. It was founded in 1790 with a donation of books from Benjamin Franklin. But when the pandemic hit, like all other libraries in the state, the Franklin library closed its doors — leaving patrons like long-time resident Safdar Mahmud eagerly awaiting its return.

“I’m a teacher. … So, for me, libraries are very important,” Mahmud said. “Just to have the distinction of Franklin being one of those historical places — there’s even books in there that were sent by [Benjamin] Franklin, and some of the original books going back to the early 1700s are actually housed in there.”

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Libraries are needed more than ever. But many aren’t sure how to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic

Jazmine Adams-McNeal tried time and time again to explain to her young daughter why their weekly trips to the library stopped suddenly in March.

It didn’t go over well.

“It was a lot of meltdowns,” said Adams-McNeal, 31, of Ferguson, Missouri. She, her wife and their children – a 4-year-old girl and twin 2-year-old boys – are staples at their local library.  “My daughter grew up at the library. We stay going to all the programs. Definitely the lap-times on Fridays.”

Read more from USA Today

In It Together 6/3/2020

For the rest of the week, we are exploring businesses that are set to re-open under the second phase of Governor Charlie Baker’s re-opening plan.

Today, we looked at day cares and libraries.

First, we spoke with the owner and president of Magical Beginnings, which has six child care locations on the North Shore. Linda Hassapis said her company has been open for emergency child care throughout the pandemic and that model was working great. She had some criticism on the Governor’s guidance for her business.

Then, we heard about the challenges facing libraries across the state from Rob Favini, head of Library Advisory and Development at the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners.

Read more on WGBH