NEWS RELEASE

Increased FY 2015 Funding Benefits Small Libraries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 04, 2015
Celeste Bruno
Communications Specialist
1-800-952-7403 x208
celeste.bruno@state.ma.us

Increased FY 2015 Funding Benefits Small Libraries

Small public libraries that have struggled to be part of automated library networks will receive funding to support network membership through the newly created Small Libraries in Networks - New Participants program approved by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC) at its January board meeting.

The program is made possible by increased FY 2015 state funding to the MBLC's Technology and Resource Sharing budget line (account 7000-9506).

"Network membership saves local libraries money and improves library services," Cindy Roach, the MBLC's head of library advisory and development, said. "It is important for all libraries, but particularly so for small libraries because it enables them to become the portal for rural and isolated residents to have access to holdings in libraries throughout the Commonwealth."

The Small Libraries in Networks grant program has existed since 2002. Through the program, libraries receive state funding to offset the annual cost of belonging to a network.

However, budget reductions to the MBLC's Technology and Resource Sharing budget line (account 7000-9506) totaling 30% since 2002 had frozen the program. With $102,500 in new funding available, many libraries will benefit.

They fall into two categories:

1) Network members that have received partial funding. The offset for network membership is typically $2,500 for annual membership per full member. However, due to funding limitations, six libraries have been funded at $1,800 or less. The following libraries will now receive the full offset amount:

Network

Municipality

Library

Population

C/WMARS

Brookfield

Merrick Public Library

3,403

C/WMARS

East Brookfield

East Brookfield Public Library

2,186

C/WMARS

Florida

Florida Public Library

749

C/WMARS

Stockbridge

Stockbridge Library Association

1,961

C/WMARS

Wales

Wales Public Library

1,864

C/WMARS

West Stockbridge

West Stockbridge Public Library

1,295


2) Network members that have never received the funding offset (represented in blue on the Small Libraries in Networks Map). Many libraries serving populations of fewer than 10,000 had never received an offset for their membership because they were either already a member of a network before the program was created, or they joined a network while the program was frozen.

Network

Municipality

Library

Population

C/WMARS

Ashfield

Belding Memorial Library (Inc.)

1,737

C/WMARS

Ayer

Ayer Library

7,427

C/WMARS

Hadley

Goodwin Memorial Library

5,250

C/WMARS

Harvard

Harvard Public Library

6,520

C/WMARS

Hatfield

Hatfield Public Library

3,279

C/WMARS

Heath

Heath Free Public Library

706

C/WMARS

Lancaster

Thayer Memorial Library

8,055

C/WMARS

Millville

Millville Free Public Library

3,190

C/WMARS

Monson

Monson Free Library and Reading Room Association

8,560

C/WMARS

Monterey

Monterey Library

961

C/WMARS

New Marlborough

New Marlborough Town Library

1,509

C/WMARS

Otis

Otis Library and Museum

1,612

C/WMARS

Paxton

Richards Memorial Library

4,806

C/WMARS

Rowe

Rowe Town Library

393

C/WMARS

Rutland

Rutland Free Public Library

7,973

C/WMARS

Southwick

Southwick Public Library

9,502

C/WMARS

Templeton

Boynton Public Library

8,013

C/WMARS

West Brookfield

Merriam-Gilbert Public Library

3,701

C/WMARS

Williamstown

David and Joyce Milne Public Library

7,754

CLAMS

Brewster

Brewster Ladies Library

9,820

CLAMS

Chatham

Eldredge Public Library

6,125

CLAMS

Eastham

Eastham Public Library

4,956

CLAMS

Edgartown

Edgartown Free Public Library

4,067

CLAMS

Oak Bluffs

Oak Bluffs Public Library

4,527

CLAMS

Orleans

Snow Library

5,890

CLAMS

Provincetown

Provincetown Public Library

2,942

CLAMS

Tisbury

Vineyard Haven Public Library

3,949

CLAMS

Truro

Truro Public Library

2,003

CLAMS

Wellfleet

Wellfleet Public Library

2,750

MassCat

Ashburnham

Stevens Memorial Library

6,081

MassCat

Nahant

Nahant Public Library

3,410

MassCat

Oakham

Fobes Memorial Library

1,902

MassCat

Pelham

Pelham Library

1,321

MVLC

Boxford

Boxford Town Library

7,965

MVLC

Carlisle

Gleason Public Library

4,852

MVLC

Essex

T.O.H.P. Burnham Free Library

3,504

MVLC

Hamilton-Wenham

Hamilton-Wenham Public Library

7,764

MVLC

Littleton

Reuben Hoar Library

8,924

MVLC

Manchester-by-the-Sea

Manchester-by-the-Sea Public Library

5,136

MVLC

Merrimac

Merrimac Public Library

6,338

MVLC

Newbury

Newbury Town Library

6,666

MVLC

Rockport

Rockport Public Library

6,952

MVLC

Rowley

Rowley Public Library

5,856

MVLC

Salisbury

Salisbury Public Library

8,283

MVLC

Topsfield

Topsfield Town Library

6,085

MVLC

West Newbury

G. A. R. Memorial Library

4,235

OCLN

Avon

Avon Public Library

4,356

OCLN

Cohasset

Paul Pratt Memorial Library

7,542

SAILS

Berkley

Berkley Public Library

6,411

SAILS

Dighton

Dighton Public Library

7,086

SAILS

Freetown

James White Memorial Library

8,870

SAILS

Halifax

Holmes Public Library

7,518

SAILS

Marion

Elizabeth Taber Library

4,907

SAILS

Mattapoisett

Mattapoisett Free Public Library

6,045

SAILS

Plainville

Plainville Public Library

8,264

SAILS

Plympton

Plympton Public Library

2,820

SAILS

Rochester

Joseph H. Plumb Memorial Library

5,232

SAILS

West Bridgewater

West Bridgewater Public Library

6,916

Automated library networks provide libraries with Internet connections that make efficient cost effective automated library operation possible and they facilitate sharing materials between libraries. They also provide centralized and automated library services that save local libraries time and money including Wi-Fi, cataloging materials, mobile and multilingual interfaces that improve patron access, and online reservation of materials.

Based on input from librarians from across the Commonwealth, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners has made increased funding to Technology and Resource Sharing a priority in its FY 2016 Legislative Agenda.

Established in 1890, the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners was the first state library commission in the United States. The nine-member volunteer commission is appointed by the governor. The MBLC supports statewide programming and innovation in libraries to ensure equal access to library services for every resident in the Commonwealth.

MBLC services include public library construction, preservation and disaster prevention, electronic resources, statewide resource sharing, and state and federal grants. The MBLC funds the Massachusetts Library System, the Library for the Commonwealth at Boston Public Library, Perkins Talking Book Library, the Talking Book Library at Worcester Public Library, and the Massachusetts Center for the Book. It also partially supports the nine automated library networks.

About MBLC

The Board of Library Commissioners (mass.gov/mblc) is the agency of state government with the statutory authority and responsibility to organize, develop, coordinate and improve library services throughout the Commonwealth. The Board advises municipalities and library trustees on the operation and maintenance of public libraries, including construction and renovation. It administers state and federal grant programs for libraries and promotes cooperation among all types of libraries through regional library systems and automated resource sharing. It also works to ensure that all residents of the Commonwealth, regardless of their geographic location, social or economic status, age, level of physical or intellectual ability or cultural background, have access to essential new electronic information technologies and significant electronic databases.